Blog Section

Teach Your Children to Struggle

momreadingoptimizedI have noticed that most parents try their best to teach their children to succeed. Of course we do! All parents want their children to grow into successful happy adults. No parent wants his or her child to suffer or be unhappy. Fortunately, life will always bring struggles and hardship no matter how much we love or prepare our children. Yes, I said fortunately.
When we don’t allow ourselves as parents to struggle, our kids never watch it or learn how to do it themselves. Children can develop the belief that everything has to be okay all the time. “Mom and Dad always have it together, so I should too.” That is an expectation that will surely be met with disappointment and failure. Here are some ways you can help your children expect struggles and embrace them.

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Studio 5 with LCSW Holly Willard: Encouraging Honesty in Children

Let’s face it: young children lie. They make up stories and often exaggerate what really happened. So how can we encourage honesty in our kids?

LCSW Holly Willard gives us some insight on this topic. She says the age of the child matters. A 3-year-old doesn’t developmentally understand what it means to lie, so this is innocence and we don’t really have to worry about it. When a child is 5-6, his/her mind goes back and forth between fantasy and reality, so we can try to help him/her understand what is real and what is not. By 7-8, it’s time to hold our kids accountable for telling the truth.

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What To Do When You Don’t Like Your Child’s Friends: Julie Hanks interview LDS Living


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Have you ever gotten bad vibes from one of your children’s friends? Maybe you felt like he/she was a negative influence or was causing your son or daughter to be unhappy.  It can be hard to know when you as a parent should get involved and when it’s better to just let things be.

Julie Hanks recently offered her views to LDS Living Magazine on how to best handle these situations. Here are a few strategies for what to do when you don’t like your kids’ friends:

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Julie Hanks to Present at Uplift Families Parenting Conference with Utah’s First Lady

Uplift Families ConferenceI have the pleasure to speak at the Uplift Families Parenting Conference on September 13th. Hosted by Utah First Lady Jeanette Herbert, this exciting event will feature several prominent presenters who will help us learn to develop and celebrate meaningful child-parent relationships. Come and be inspired as we discuss ways to uplift Utah families! Dinner is included.

My presentation will be focused on an area that parents (especially mothers) often neglect…yep, you guessed it! I’ll be tackling the topic of self-care for parents.

Get Event Details

Purchase Tickets

Download the 2014 Uplift Families Conference E-Poster

Get info about my book The Burnout Cure: An Emotional Survival Guide for Overwhelmed Women.

Hope to see you in a few weeks at the conference!

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KIDS Social Skills Group – Fall 2014

This 8 week group is designed to help school-aged children navigate the challenges of social situations and understand what it means to be a friend. Focusing on understanding their role and impact on those in their world.

  • Keep and make friends
  • Increase self-esteem
  • Discover skills for coping with anxiety
  • Strengthen social skills

Next Session begins: Monday, September 15th (4:30 – 5:30 PM)

Price$50 per week/ per child

Ages: 8-12

 

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Should You Let Your Kids Win at Games? Studio 5

Games are a fun family activity. But how important is winning for children? Should parents play full out, or are there times when they should let kids win?

In an article that’s going viral, a blogger who goes by The Lunchbox Dad says when he and wife “play board games, sports, card games, or hopscotch with our kids-we don’t let them win. We never have.”

LCSW Julie Hanks had the opportunity to discuss this topic with other Studio 5 contributors.  Her main view was that games are a good way to teach children that accomplishments do not equal self-worth. If a child loses, a parent can help him/her understand that winning isn’t everything. This is an opportunity to model what a good winner….and a good loser looks like. The comfort of home may be the perfect place for a child to experience losing a competition.

Another point that came up in the discussion is that whether or not parents let their kids win is perhaps best based on their age. Young children may get a much needed confidence boost from feeling that they’ve won, but with teenage kids, parents probably want to bring their A game.

Click here to read the article in full.

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Starting the School Year off Right – Balancing An Adjustment Period with Assessing True Needs

canstockphoto13946484August is here!  Most stores have shelves stocked full with back to school supplies and school employees are beginning to attend meetings and trainings to properly prepare for the 2014-2014 school year. Typically, teachers, parents, and (most) students are thinking ahead, using experiences from last school year in order to make the current school year even better. For most,  the school year ended fairly well this year will likely be a relatively easy adjustment.

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6 Way to Raise an Empathetic Child

momreadingoptimizedEmpathy is the skill to understand the world from another person’s point of view and then to act based on that understanding.   It may be hard to believe but empathy starts young.  After experiencing a particularly trying day, tears ran down my cheeks.  It did not take more than a minute for my 3-year old daughter to grab a towel and begin to wipe them away.  This was her way of showing empathy for me, her mother.  I was touched by her actions and hoped she would keep this sweet quality forever.  

As parents we can assist our children in developing and fostering empathy.  Below are six creative ways where you and your child can begin to take the risk together.

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Turning Your Child’s Aggression into Healthy Expressions

MAD BOYFrustration and anger often marks itself as shoving, hitting, and other aggressive behaviors in children. Teaching children how to handle their feelings reduces aggressive behaviors by giving them alternative openings. Children who display aggressive behaviors need support and direction to help them manage their behaviors and responses in different situations and environments. Although many children have occasional outbursts of anger and aggression, the children who have the support of parents who moderate and channel their children’s aggression towards healthy development will be able to operate with the skills to express their emotions and behaviors in a healthy way.

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Is Your Teen a Bully? 4 Signs and Ways to Address the Issue

Wasatch Family Therapy TeensIn today’s media we hear more and more about the negative effects bullying has on Americas youth. As parents we do everything we can to protect our kids from  help becoming the victim of bully behavior, but what if our teen is the bully? Here are 4 signs to look for and ways to empower your teens to take a stand against bully behavior.

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