Blog Section

KIDS SOCIAL SKILLS GROUP BEGINS TOMORROW (July 15th)!

 

KIDS GROUP FLYER SLC - SUMMER 2015This weekly group is designed to help school-aged children navigate the challenges of social situations and understand what it means to be a friend. Focusing on understanding their role and impact on those in their world.

  • Keep and make friends
  • Increase self-esteem
  • Discover skills for coping with anxiety
  • Strengthen social skills

Next Group begins: Wednesday, July 15th (5:00 – 6:00 PM)

Price$50 per week/ per child

Ages: 8-12

More

Guilt: The Gift That Keeps On Giving

Stressed Mom
A quote recently appeared on my Pinterest wall. It read “You only have 936 Saturdays with your children. Make them count.” My palms started to sweat. My stomach sank. Instantly my mind raced with a million questions. Have I been using my Saturdays wisely with my kids? Do I try to accomplish too many tasks on Saturday? Do I have enough fun with my kids? Am I a fun mom? As you can probably guess the barrage of questions only lead me to feel an intense amount of “mommy guilt” over my lack of fun Saturday activities with my kids.
Too often we get caught up in a cycle of feeling guilty about the things we are or are not doing. Whether it be over children, work, spouse, or just everyday tasks we can bring ourselves down to a very negative place that is hard to get out of. Daniel Nayeri wisely said, “Guilt is a useless feeling. It’s never enough to make you change your direction-only enough to make you feel useless.” How true! Guilt is a feeling that can take our day from bright and shining to dark and dreary. If you find yourself on a constant track of guilt here are a few steps to help you get out of that cycle.
More

When Your Spouse is Depressed

Frustrated Couple

*Important disclaimer to following article- the tips below address non-suicidal depressed mood. If your partner is showing signs of suicidal ideation or talking about wanting to die, get them to emergency MEDICAL help immediately. At that point it is about life saving measures, and a spouse cannot provide that help.

Hard work and compromise are necessary to keep any marriage alive and well, even during the “up” times of life. But what happens when the stress becomes overwhelming, and emotional challenges get thrown in the marriage mix? What happens when one of the partners can’t give as much because they feel, just… down? How does a marriage whether a storm of mental health challenges?

I’m going to get very personal, with the permission (and help) of my husband. We agree that depression, and its effects on the loved ones of those suffering, is a prevalent and important issue and we are willing to share our own experience. We both have families with histories of mental illness, and have had minor bouts with “the blues” ourselves at different times when life was stressful. Over the last year, however, things got serious emotionally for my husband. His “blues” hit symptomatic levels that made daily activities and participation in family life difficult to manage. Stress from work became oppressive, and soon hopelessness and exhaustion were about the only thing he was feeling. We’ve struggled together to get through this storm and return positive, hopeful feelings to our home.

More

Dr. Hanks Publishes Peer-Review Journal Article “Bringing Partnership Home”

Dr. Hanks Publishes Peer-Review Journal Article “Bringing Partnership Home”

As part of my dissertation study I created a model of family transformation to help families move from a dominator systems to a partnership organization that values cooperation, caring, connection, collaboration,  celebration of all contributions, compassion,  conscious language usage, and creativity. Based on Riane Eisler’s Cultural Transformation Theory, my Partnership Model of Family Organization offers a path for families to shift from ranking to linking.

Bringing Partnership Home: A Model of Family Transformation

Free article access here http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/ijps/vol2/iss1/4/

Julie de Azevedo Hanks, PhD, Wasatch Family Therapy

Abstract:

Eisler’s cultural transformation theory suggests that the global crises we face can be addressed only through movement to a partnership model of social organization. Drawing on cultural transformation theory and systems theory, a partnership model of family organization (PMFO) is outlined as a practical framework to guide families toward partnership relations. Eight components of PMFO are presented and expanded on as a path toward furthering familial and societal transformation. The eight tenets of a PMFO are: 1) cooperative adult leadership, 2) connecting orientation, 3) caretaking emphasis, 4) collaborative roles and rules, 5) celebration of unique contributions, 6) compassionate communication, 7) conscious language use, and 8) collection and creation of partnership stories. Finally, specific strategies of application of the PMFO will be discussed.

Keywords:

Cultural transformation theory, marriage and family therapy, family organization, partnership model, dominator model, partnership model of family organization, family life, partnership studies, partnership families

Download the article for free http://pubs.lib.umn.edu/ijps/vol2/iss1/4/

More

Social Skills: Let’s Teach Them !

canstockphoto2311099(1)

As this school year wraps up, most students and parents will eagerly, or  for some anxiously, wait for report cards. Progress in reading, math, writing, physical education and perhaps, depending on your district or structure of your school, aspects of learning such as ‘motivation’ or ‘character’ will be indicated somewhere on the document. However, do you know how your child is functioning regarding social skills? Does it really matter?

Research in education today signals a resounding yes. In generations past, children acquired these skills almost exclusively at home and within their families. With increasing negative societal influences and various sources of stress bombarding so many of us, it’s hard for parents to go it alone. Schools can often be an important partner with parents to provide positive social skills development. Yet, what can you do if your child doesn’t seem to be interacting socially in age appropriate ways?

More

5 Ways To Be an Amazing Mother-In-Law: Dr. Julie Hanks on KSL’s Studio 5

When an adult child gets married, it can be difficult for his/her parents to navigate their new role as an in-laws. I am learning this myself, as my oldest son got married in the not too distant past. Unfortunately, our culture has created a negative stereotype of in-laws (particularly mother-in-laws), but your own experience can be a positive one! Here are 5 ways to be an amazing mother-in-law:

5 Ways to Be an Amazing Mother-In-Law

1) Expect and Embrace Differences A family unit can thought of as a sort of “organism;” it has its own traditions, belief system, and even its own quirks. When a new person enters this family (through marriage), there are bound to be differences. Recognize that there is no such thing as a completely seamless transition, and expect your new son-in-law or daughter-in-law to do some things in a new way. You can learn to celebrate these differences as well! It can also be helpful to talk about family expectations in order to navigate this change.

More

Counseling Doesn’t Mean You’re Crazy: 3 Subtle Signs it’s Time to See a Therapist (PART 2)

Wasatch Family Therapy Depression

 

Ashley Thorn, LMFT gives a few more signs that it might be helpful for you to seek a therapist, and also some guidelines about where to start.  Finding a therapist can be a stressful and difficult task, but these tips should point you in the right direction.

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2015/06/04/4-more-subtle-signs-for-seeing-a-therapist-and-finding-a-good-one/

More

Counseling Doesn’t Mean You’re Crazy: 3 Subtle Signs it’s Time to See a Therapist (PART 1)

Talk-Therapy-Touted-as-First-Line-Treatment-for-Youth-with-Psychosis-Risk
Ever think that you might want to see a therapist, but not sure if it’s for you?  Sometimes people need or want help with their emotional and mental well-being, but they are afraid that if they seek therapy they might come across as “crazy” or be judged in some way.
Click on the link below to read what Ashley Thorn, LMFT has to say about some of the signs you can look for to see if therapy might be a good fit for you, and get a different perspective on who is a “candidate” for counseling.
http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2015/05/30/3-subtle-signs-its-time-to-see-a-therapist/
More

Family Vacation Tips!

FAMILY VACA

Are you heading out on a family vacation this summer?  Click the link below to see what tips Clair Mellenthin, LCSW has on how to make the best vacation yet!

http://www.kutv.com/fresh-living/features/main/stories/Family-trips-are-healthy-143648.shtml#.VW35sc_BzGc

More

Five Signs of a Manipulative Relationship: Dr. Julie Hanks on KSL’s Studio 5

unnamed-1

Most of us understand that a relationship in which an individual tries to control or manipulate the other person is not a healthy one. And while no relationship is perfect, some have chronic patterns of manipulation that can be damaging to an individual’s emotional wellbeing and can likewise hurt the connection itself. But how can we spot such a relationship? We tend to think of obvious big indications of manipulation, but others are more subtle. Here are 5 signs to watch out for that may be evidence of a manipulative relationship:

1) You Feel Responsible for Your Partner’s Happiness

At the root of all of this is the quest for satisfaction and contentment in relationships. But if you feel personally responsible for your partner’s happiness, you may be experiencing some level of manipulation. There is a difference between being sensitive toward and aware of the needs of your significant other and feeling like it is your job to make that person happy.  Do you feel like you have to do things perfectly, look a certain way, and complete certain tasks to please the other person? These are unreasonable expectations and may signify that the other person is (subtly) manipulating you.

More