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When Your Holidays Aren’t Merry: Dr. Julie Hanks on Mom Show on KSL Radio

When Your Holidays Aren’t Merry: Dr. Julie Hanks on Mom Show on KSL Radio

The pressure to be cheerful and happy during the holidays can be particularly hard for people dealing with grief and loss: the death of a loved one, your first Christmas since being divorced, job loss, or just the passage of time. Lindsay Aerts, host of The Mom Show on KSL Radio, and I sat down to talk about how to manage painful feelings during a time when you’re “supposed” to be merry.

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How to Start Your Own Family Holiday Traditions: Dr. Julie Hanks on KSL Mom Show

How to Start Your Own Family Holiday Traditions: Dr. Julie Hanks on KSL Mom Show

If you’ve decided it’s time to do your own immediate family traditions for the holidays, how do you break it to your extended family that you won’t be joining them this year?  I talk with Lindsay Aerts from KSL Radio’s The Mom Show about how to start the conversation and manage difficult feelings that might arise.

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How to Help Your Anxious Daughter: Studio 5

How to Help Your Anxious Daughter: Studio 5


All parents want to raise strong, confident, happy daughters, but there’s evidence showing that female adolescents are experiencing high levels of stress and anxiety. A recent article in the Deseret News suggests that young women are having a rough time; researchers are seeing anxiety, self-harm, and even suicide in girls as young as 10. In recent years, I have witnessed an increase in the number of referrals of young people (girls and boys) to my therapy practice who are experiencing these same sorts of issues. Clearly, we have a real cultural problem to address, and there’s certainly reason to be concerned.

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Aspirational Shame and Motherhood: The Mom Show

Aspirational Shame and Motherhood: The Mom Show

What a delight to talk with Lindsay Aerts for her new KSL Newsradio show “The Mom Show”. We talked about motherhood, self-care, and aspirational shame. Listen to the entire interview below.

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May is Date Your Mate Month! Kathleen Baxter, AMFT – Interview on KUTV

May is “date your mate” month! Wasatch Family Therapy’s Kathleen Baxter, AMFT, recently sat down for an interview on KUTV to discuss ways to keep marriage relationships strong and healthy. But first, she explained some of the biggest obstacles couples may face:

Some may panic when they realize they don’t feel the same way about their partner as they once did. But it is normal and expected for a relationship to change after marriage, so it isn’t necessarily an indication of a problem. Also, many couples “stop” being spouses because they are now parents. A couple’s devotion to their children can unfortunately lessen their devotion to each other.

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Highly Educated Women Are Having More Babies: Julie Hanks, LCSW Interview with WSJ’s Marketwatch

timthumbWasatch Family Therapist founder and owner Dr. Julie Hanks, LCSW had the opportunity to be interviewed for the MarketWatch section of the Wall Street Journal about her experience pursuing a career while also being a mother. It is very encouraging and exciting that recent studies show that women with advanced degrees and education are also having children. Whereas in the past, women either had families or great jobs, today the tide is turning, and we no longer have to choose!

What are the factors causing this change? Fathers helping with domestic responsibilities and raising children, a mobile workforce, and increased opportunities are among the reasons that highly educated women are having more babies.

Here’s an excerpt:

Julie de Azevedo Hanks, is the owner and executive director of Wasatch Family Therapy in Salt Lake City, Utah, and the mother to four children. On Saturday, she will graduate from University of Louisiana at Monroe with a Ph.D. in marriage and family therapy. “Tomorrow, I will be Dr. Julie Hanks.”

When it came to education and children, her motto for the past 25 years has been, ‘I refuse to choose!’ “Women seem to be challenging the long-held notion that an education/career and family are mutually exclusive,” Hanks says. “It’s no longer an either/or decision.”

She’s not alone. The number of highly educated women who are remaining childless into their mid-40s has plummeted over the last two decades, according to a new study by the nonprofit Pew Research Center, which crunched U.S. Census data.

Read the full article here.

 

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5 Steps to a Powerful Apology: LCSW Julie Hanks on KSL’s Studio 5


Human beings are prone to mistakes, and we all have the experience of doing or saying something that has hurt another person (even someone we value and love). In order to repair those precious relationships, it is often necessary to apologize. But simply saying, “I’m sorry” is rarely enough. Here are 5 steps to giving a powerful, sincere apology:

1) Own Your Part
5 steps to a powerful apology
To truly mean that you are sorry, you need to own up to the specific thing you said or did that contributed to the other person’s pain. Take full responsibility for the part you played. Avoid general statements (“I’m sorry for whatever I did to hurt you”) or making reservations about the mistake you made. Have the courage to own up to your fault.

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Does My Child Have an Anxiety Disorder?

SCHOOL KID ANXIETYAs a child, the world is full of fears and challenges, real and imaginary, that adults cannot recollect from their own childhood. Most of these childhood fears and challenges are temporary and eventually outgrown, but studies show that one in eight children suffer from an anxiety disorder and anxiety has become one of the most common mental health conditions in children. At some point in life, children will experience some form of anxiety, however, when the symptoms become distressing and interfere with normal living then the anxiety can be considered and classified as an anxiety disorder. The mind and emotions of a child are continuously changing and developing at different rates, so it may not always be easy to distinguish normal fears and challenges from those that may require additional attention. That is why it is important to important not only to assess the severity of the symptoms that obstruct daily living, but also be aware of the developmental progress of each individual child. Assessing if the fears and behaviors are appropriate on a developmental level is crucial for each child. Many situations will cause children to display anxiety; however, if they continue beyond reasonable age norms, or are intense and distressing, then it could likely be the beginning stage of an anxiety disorder. These intense or distressing anxieties can eventually cause more serious distress, destroy a family system, and interfere with a child’s development or education.
Anxiety disorders that your child could be experiencing are:

Generalized anxiety disorder. With this common anxiety disorder, children worry excessively about many things, such as school, the health or safety of family members, or the future in general. They may always think of the worst that could happen. Children with generalized anxiety tend to be very hard on themselves and strive for perfection. Children with this disorder are self-conscious, self-doubting, and excessively concerned about meeting other people’s expectations. Along with the worry and dread, kids may have physical symptoms, such as headaches, stomachaches, muscle tension, or tiredness. With generalized anxiety, worries can feel like a burden, making life feel overwhelming or out of control.

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Understanding Mormon Guilt and Shame: Julie Hanks fMh Podcast


Understanding Mormon Guilt and Shame

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5 Mistakes Parents Make with Overweight Children: Studio 5

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Mistakes Parents Make When Child is Overweight

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