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Five Ways to Develop Resilience: Julie Hanks on KSL’s Studio 5

Five Ways to Develop Resilience: Julie Hanks on KSL’s Studio 5


Everyone goes through challenging experiences: loss, illness, divorce, and other hardships can take a heavy emotional toll. Resilience is being able overcome these kind of struggles and is the ability to “bounce back.” But you don’t have to wait until the storms hit to develop this skill. Here are 5 ways to build resilience for when you really need it:

1) Seek 3:1 Ratio of Positive to Negative Emotions  

Studies about highly resilient people show that they don’t experience fewer negative emotions, but instead experience more positive emotions. In other words, we don’t have to fake anything or pretend that we don’t feel difficult emotions, but we can foster positivity to help balance them. Trying to hit a 3:1 ratio of positive to negative emotions can put things in perspective and help develop resilience (take the test at positivityratio.com to see how you are doing!).

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Feelings Word List: FREE Download

Feelings Word List: FREE Download

An important first step in developing emotional health is becoming more aware of your internal emotional cues. Once you learned to recognize that you’re feeling something, the next step is to give a label to the emotion you’re experiencing. Interestingly, the very act of naming your feelings helps reduce the intensity of the feeling, making it more manageable.

Use this feelings word list to help you label your feelings and increase your feeling vocabulary.

Feeling word list (pdf download)

I you need additional support to manage your emotions, we can help. Get to know our therapists and their specialty areas.

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Mindful Multicultural Parenting

TIPS FOR MINDFUL MULTICULTURAL PARENTS
One of the things I have learned about the most as a parent of multicultural kids is the importance of being mindful and staying in the moment. This isn’t the easiest thing to do and yet, it’s one of the best things to do. You’ll see lots of parents blogging about how they’ve stopped yelling or stopped using their electronic devices as a way to be more mindful and present with their kids. Being mindful has its benefits in that it allows you to pay attention in the moment and, as parents, to use the moment to create meaningful connection with our kids.

As a multicultural parent, the same goal applies when being mindful in those quick moments of questioning that kids give us ever so often. When it comes to addressing cultural differences, many times we experience a hesitation that is just quick enough to send a message to our kids that “we don’t talk about differences.” And, in our not-so-great moments, we scold our kids for asking an age or developmentally appropriate question based on our own discomfort around differences.

When we are mindful we can create teaching moments in response to our kids’ curiosity by engaging in the present moment as it’s happening. There is a balance to doing this because you want to do it in a way that intentionally educates, demystifies, and normalizes differences so that you can connect with your child comfortably and confidently.

Here’s one of my stories.

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How to Deal with Critical People

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We’ve all met those people that seem to offer up more criticism than healthy advice or positive reinforcement.  Learning how interact with those overly critical people without letting them bring you down can be a very difficult thing.  Sometimes we may be able to simply walk away from them, but other times we are forced to have those people around us.  If you ever struggle with this, here is an article with some of my thoughts and tips on how to more effectively respond to the critical people in your life.
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Making the ‘Invisible’ Work of Caregiving Visible: An evening with Julie Hanks

Making the ‘Invisible’ Work of Caregiving Visible: An evening with Julie Hanks

Caring Economy Conversation final for reals

Join Julie Hanks for a Caring Economy Discussion

Date: Thursday, March 26
Time: 7:309:00 pm
Location: Wasatch Family Therapy
7084 South 2300 East Suite 215
Cottonwood Heights, UT 84121
RSVP by 3.20.15 HERE

 Download flier (pdf download)

  • How can we make the “invisible” work of caregiving more visible and valued?
  • It’s estimated that 75% of unpaid caregiving work is provided by women?
  • Did you  know that 1 in 3 women (and her children) live in poverty or are teetering on the brink?
  • Did you know that volunteer, household management, and caregiving comprises 30-60% of the GDP, but isn’t even included in our economic equation?
  • Join me for a discussion group about how we can create a more Caring Economy
  • Learn more about the Caring Economy Campaign here

 

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Twitting Your Anger is not Treating Your Anger

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Many of our lives are hectic, busy, and can become stressful.  As humans it’s not unusual for us to feel angry at times and want to lash out when our buttons have been pushed.  Some believe that getting their anger out is a form of catharsis and is the best way to overcome one’s negative feelings towards another.

Jeffrey Lohr, a psychology professor who studied “Venting in the Treatment of Anger” said, “Venting may make you feel different in the moment, but the change in emotional state doesn’t necessarily feel better; it may just feel less bad.”  People may vent in all sorts of ways including punching a pillow, blowing up at another person, yelling and screaming, confronting someone immediately after the offense, slamming doors, or using social media as an outlet to rant about their anger.

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Successful Practices for Dual-Earner Families

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Can children raised in dual-income households be happier than children raised by a stay-at-home parent?  According to a landmark survey done by Ellen Galinsky (1999, 2005) the answer is yes!  Galinsky found that children overwhelmingly endorse having both fathers and mothers working.  It appears that the concern over who should work and how much they should work is largely limited to us as parents.

So what do children worry about?  Through Galinsky’s surveys she found that children are focused on the time they have with their parents at home.  They are concerned that when their parents are home, they be less stressed and tired and more emotionally available to them.  Insert therapy buzzword [balance].

As parents we strive for balance, and whether or not they tell us directly, our children desire a balanced home.  Here are ten practices that can support you and your partner as you work to attain balance in your home.

-Prioritize family time and well-being

-Emphasize overall equality and partnership, including joint decision making, equal influence over finances, and joint responsibility for housework

-Equally value each other’s work and life goals

-Share parental duties and “emotional work” of family life

-Maximize paly and fun at home

-Concentrate on work while at the workplace (If your home is also your workplace, make sure there is a well defined boundary between workspace/work time, and family space/family time)

-Take pride in family and in balancing multiple roles, and believing the family benefits from both parents working (rather than adsorbing the dominant cultural narrative of harm)

-Live simply, which includes limiting activities that impede active family engagement

-Adopt high but realistic expectations about household management; employing planning strategies that save time

-Be proactive in decision making and remain conscious of time’s value

 

Adapted from Normal Family Processes: Growing Diversity and Complexity, Fourth Edition By Froma Walsh PhD MSW

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How to Help When a Friend is Unhappy: Julie Hanks on KSL’s Studio 5

How to Help When a Friend is Unhappy: Julie Hanks on KSL’s Studio 5

True friends often go through a lot together. They experience the joys and good times, and sometimes they seeeach other through harder seasons of life as well. But it can be difficult to know exactly how to react when a friend is weathering a particularly difficult storm or is in some way unfulfilled. Here are 5 strategies to employ when a friend is unhappy

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Is Perfectionism Hereditary?

Talk-Therapy-Touted-as-First-Line-Treatment-for-Youth-with-Psychosis-RiskPerfectionism, the constant fear of failure and simply “not feeling good enough.” To a perfectionist mistakes are indications of personal flaws and the only way for acceptance is to be perfect.   Our high expectations often leave us feeling inadequate and falling short of what we could be.  But nobody is perfect at life, nothing is meant to be flawless.  When we realize we are not expected to be perfect and that we are here to learn, we are able to develop compassion for ourselves and others.

This perfectionistic trait can easily be passed down to our children because they feel like they are not good enough in their parent’s and their own eyes.  Here are some ideas to help interfere with this vicious cycle:

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DBT WOMEN’S GROUP BEGINS MARCH 10th!

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Next Group Begins March 10th, 2015!

Tuesdays 6:00-7:30 pm

Led by Monette Cash, LCSW

Women’s DBT Skills Group is a 3-series skills group that teaches basic skills
such as how to manage your emotions so they dont control your life-how
to cope effectively with difficult relationships- and learning how to
react calmly rather than impulsively in order to avoid unhealthy
escapes. This 3 module skill group will run in 6 week segments and
all are necessary to have lasting success.

Series 1: (6 weeks / Mar. 10 – Apr. 14)  Mindfulness and Distress Tolerance

Series 2: (6 weeks / Apr. 21 – May. 26)  Mindfulness and Emotional Regulation

Series 3: (6 weeks / Sept. 8 – Oct. 13) Mindfulness and Interpersonal
Effectiveness

Please contact us to register for the group!

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